Laura Neilson Bonikowsky

Laura Neilson Bonikowsky is the associate
editor of The Canadian Encyclopedia.

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Laura Neilson Bonikowsky's Latest Posts

The day the circuses came to town

The day the circuses came to town

When the steamship Queen Victoria sailed into Charlottetown Harbour on Sept. 1, 1864, she was the last to arrive at the party, bringing the delegation from the Province of Canada to one of the most significant events in Canada’s history. One would expect that the ship’s arrival would have been cause for a certain amount […]

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Coming to Canada: An overview of immigration history

| September 30, 2013 | 1 Comment
Coming to Canada: An overview of immigration history

In Statistics Canada’s 2011 National Household Survey, the ethnic origin most often selected by respondents was Canadian, reported by more than 10.5 million people. It was followed by English, French, Scottish, Irish and German. Canada is often called a land of immigrants. And it is true that all Canadians are either from somewhere else, or […]

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The Arctic, country by country

| October 4, 2012 | 0 Comments
The Arctic, country by country

Our eight-country primer takes you to each of the council’s member states and offers a breakdown of their Arctic territory, interests and claims. By Laura Neilson Bonikowsky   CANADA Area: 9,984,670 sq km Population: 34,476,688 (2012) Canada’s frigid Arctic is definitely something to get hot and bothered about. It makes up more than 40 percent […]

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Canada’s first Olympic gold-medalist

Canada’s first Olympic gold-medalist

On the official Olympic Games website, there are two records concerning George Orton at the Paris Olympics in 1900. The records show he won a bronze medal in the 400-metre men’s hurdles and a gold medal in the 3000-metre steeplechase. The records note his country as Canada, making George Orton the first Canadian to win […]

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Yonge Street: Governor Simcoe’s military road

Yonge Street: Governor Simcoe’s military road

By Laura Neilson Bonikowsky I have ascertained by a Route hitherto unknown but to some Indian Hunters, that there is an easy Portage between York and the Waters which fall into Lake Huron of not more than thirty miles in extent…. and hope to compleat (sic) the Military Street or Road the ensuing Autumn.” ~ […]

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The big Pig War

| February 12, 2012 | 0 Comments
The big Pig War

The boundary between Canada and the United States was a matter of dispute between 1783 and 1872, when the issue was arbitrated by German Emperor Wilhelm I. The last portion of the boundary had been ambiguously determined by the Oregon Treaty of 1846, which extended the 49th parallel “to the middle of the channel which […]

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Win, lose or draw? Mythology of the War of 1812

| October 26, 2011 | 0 Comments
Win, lose or draw? Mythology of the War of 1812

Two hundred years after the War of 1812 began, the war, and the question of who won, remains lodged in the Canadian tendency toward cultural mythologizing. The war was fought between Great Britain and the United States and involved Upper and Lower Canada (today Ontario and the southern portion of Quebec, respectively) and many First […]

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God save the Queen — and other royal visitors

God save the Queen — and other royal visitors

This summer’s visit to Canada of Prince William and his bride, Catherine, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, continues a long tradition of royal visits to this country. That Canada was chosen as the destination for their first official visit as a couple reflects Canada’s importance within the Commonwealth — an importance that has made […]

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From Russia with love, the Doukhobors set sail

| December 1, 2010 | 0 Comments
From Russia with love, the Doukhobors set sail

Bewildered spectators watched as 700 men, women and children trudged through the port city of Batum, Russia, in pairs, carrying boards on their shoulders. It was December 1898 and they were volunteers from a large group of Doukhobors preparing for the largest single migration across the Atlantic to North America. They were bound for Canada […]

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Thomas Chandler Haliburton, aka Sam Slick

| September 2, 2010 | 0 Comments
Thomas Chandler Haliburton, aka Sam Slick

Thomas Haliburton was an upper-crust Tory, a successful lawyer and businessman who was appointed to Nova Scotia’s Supreme Court and held office in England after his retirement. He was wealthy, respected and influential — and deeply frustrated. As a member of the conservative elite, Haliburton could not freely express his progressive opinions in Nova Scotia […]

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