Robert I. Rotberg

Robert I. Rotberg is Fulbright Research Professor at the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University and a senior fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation.

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Robert I. Rotberg's Latest Posts

Killing off Africa’s iconic animals

| July 6, 2019 | 0 Comments
Killing off Africa’s iconic animals

Many of the iconic fauna that are indelibly associated with Africa, and that attract so many local citizens and foreign tourists alike, no longer spread limitlessly across the vast savannahs of the mid-continent. Nor are many of the larger animals of the unbroken forest often visible. This century’s massive escalation of illegal poaching has decimated […]

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Africa’s economic prospects

| April 1, 2019 | 0 Comments
Africa’s economic prospects

Population numbers throughout most of Africa will continue to increase severely over the next 30 years. Unless women in sub-Saharan Africa suddenly stop having more than two and sometimes as many as seven children, the gross labour force, unskilled and skilled, in almost every country will continue to grow despite existing, and alarming, unemployment rates […]

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Africa: What to expect in 2019

| December 29, 2018 | 0 Comments
Africa: What to expect in 2019

Africa in 2019 will continue to cope with a number of difficult and debilitating challenges: Terror, civil conflict, climate warming and drought, corruption, poor governance, weak rules of law and inconsistent and lacklustre leadership. For all of those reasons, sub-Saharan African migrants will still attempt, in great numbers, to enter Europe by crossing the Sahara […]

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Africa: Unable to feed itself

| October 7, 2018 | 0 Comments
Africa: Unable to feed itself

Africa no longer feeds itself. Forty years ago, sub-Saharan Africa’s then 500 million people could grow enough staples — maize, wheat, rice, yams, cassava, sorghum, millet and the ancient grain known as teff — to keep most inhabitants free from hunger. But now there are about 1 billion sub-Saharan Africans and soon there will be […]

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Can Ramaphosa save South Africa?

| July 2, 2018 | 0 Comments
Can Ramaphosa save South Africa?

Cyril Ramaphosa is South Africa’s last best hope. Its new president inherits a series of complex and dangerous crises, and must rapidly rescue sub-Saharan Africa’s most advanced and modern country from two decades of wanton despoilment and depravity — or fail and see his nation fall fully into a yawning chasm of underdevelopment and despair. […]

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Beating back terror in Africa

| April 3, 2018 | 0 Comments
Beating back terror in Africa

Africans are containing terror and terrorists, but declaring victory against the forces of revolution and insurrection in 2018 is premature. It is still a massive work in progress. In addition to the swirl of repetitive civil conflict in such disparate African countries as Burundi, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, South […]

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Africa: Not much reason for optimism

| December 18, 2017 | 0 Comments
Africa: Not much reason for optimism

Terrorism, civil conflict, global warming, population growth, urbanization, education, economic sustainability, managing China, strengthening leadership and improving governance are Africa’s 10 most pressing problems as 2018 unfolds. None of these acute challenges is new, but 2018 will see each of them become more central to Africa’s ability to improve the standards of living and social […]

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Africa’s existential exodus

| September 30, 2017 | 0 Comments
Africa’s existential exodus

The Italian navy is tired of plucking Africans from dangerous Mediterranean waters off Libya night after night. Thousands of Africans are smuggled weekly across the dunes of the Sahara Desert from the northern outposts of Niger by people smugglers. After desperate days in holding camps in northern Libya, another set of people smugglers sends African […]

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Africa’s thirst: severe water gaps

| July 1, 2017 | 0 Comments
Africa’s thirst: severe water gaps

Ezirazi wishes she were in school. But, like so many 10-year-old African girls south of the Sahara, she has to trek early every morning and just before sunset every night to fetch water from a well 10 kilometres away. The drinking and washing needs of her family take priority over schooling. Anyway, she also has […]

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The killing fields of Africa

| April 11, 2017 | 0 Comments
The killing fields of Africa

Why do Africans kill each other so easily? Atrocities abound, whether in Burundi, the Central African Republic, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, South Sudan or Zimbabwe. Even South Africans, in fits of xenophobia, attack outsiders. Some of these episodes of murderous mayhem rise to the scale of genocide, as defined and prohibited […]

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