Tag: Debate

Overcoming Africa’s critical challenges

| January 5, 2014 | 0 Comments
Overcoming Africa’s critical challenges

Sustaining sub-Saharan Africa’s current welcome prosperity, especially an average annual GDP growth of five percent, will demand enhanced or better political leadership, improvements in prevailing methods of governance, a canny embrace of Chinese mercantilism and the ability to cope successfully with or effectively manage the many serious problems — demographics, energy shortfalls, paucities of educational […]

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Less Martin Luther, more Milton Friedman needed in the Arab world

| September 30, 2013 | 0 Comments
Less Martin Luther, more Milton Friedman needed in the Arab world

  Martin Luther and Mohamed Bouazizi, the Tunisian fruit vendor who set himself ablaze, may not seem to have much in common, but they both dropped a spark into much accumulated dry kindling and timber. That set off blazes that led to sectarian violence, revolution, additional repression and war. Martin Luther’s nailing of his 95 […]

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Saving the Euro by opening the exit door

| July 5, 2013 | 0 Comments
Saving the Euro by opening the exit door

  In 1925, Britain’s economically inexperienced chancellor of the exchequer, agonizing over the economic controversy of the day, returned Britain to the gold standard. The decision was hailed as a triumph of sound economics, necessary to protect sterling and London’s status as the world’s financial centre. Disaster followed. The Great Depression arrived half a decade […]

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Kyoto: ‘The silliest of high-minded gestures’

| April 5, 2013 | 0 Comments
Kyoto: ‘The silliest of high-minded gestures’

December 15, 2012 marked the end of what has been a less-than-stellar chapter in Canadian diplomatic history. No, I am not referring to the fact that Canada has pulled out of one of the silliest of the many high-minded gestures that increasingly characterize United Nations diplomacy. Rather, I am taking some satisfaction in Canada’s decision […]

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Syria’s fallout on Jordan, Lebanon and the Kurds

| January 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
Syria’s fallout on Jordan, Lebanon and the Kurds

What happens to Syria’s Kurds may have broader implications for Kurdish populations in Turkey, Iran and Iraq — and regional instability. By Harry Sterling “Revolutions have never lightened the burden of tyranny: they have only shifted it to another shoulder.” When author George Bernard Shaw uttered that pessimistic, certainly cynical, view more than a century ago […]

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A reflection on responsibility: What does Syria mean for R2P?

| October 4, 2012 | 0 Comments
A reflection on responsibility: What does Syria mean for R2P?

By Lloyd Axworthy and Allan Rock The world has watched in frustration as the brutal regime of Bashar al-Assad of Syria has turned its weapons against its own citizens to suppress an insurgency and cling to power. The shocking estimates of civilian casualties (some as high as 20,000) don’t measure the untold misery of the […]

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Supply management: an antiquated barrier to trade

| June 28, 2012 | 0 Comments
Supply management: an antiquated barrier to trade

The Conservative government of Stephen Harper has made it increasingly clear that international trade is one of its top economic priorities. Whether through expanding existing trade agreements (such as building on NAFTA) or negotiating new deals with the European Union, Japan, Korea, and the Trans-Pacific Partnership, Ottawa is placing ever-growing emphasis on trade deals as […]

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Preventing a slaughter of refugees

| April 12, 2012 | 0 Comments
Preventing a slaughter of refugees

Camp Ashraf was created in an Iraqi desert by several thousand Iranians, who in 1980 fled from the terror unleashed on them across Iran by Ayatollah Khomeini. Supporters of the People’s Mojahedin Organization of Iran (PMOI), founded in the 1960s by leftist university students, they had actively opposed the regimes of the shah and the […]

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NATO is neither dead nor dying

| June 26, 2011 | 0 Comments
NATO is neither dead nor dying

Lord Ismay, NATO’s first secretary-general, once wryly observed that the purpose of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was to “keep the Americans in, the Russians out, and the Germans down.” That political logic kept the alliance together during the Cold War and through the many crises it endured from its inception in 1949 until […]

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