Tag: Featured

Egypt’s ancient foods endure

| April 3, 2018 | 0 Comments
Egypt’s ancient foods endure

Since the beginning of civilization, a major influence on Egypt’s food history has been the River Nile. Archeologists have revealed through rock drawings that when the Sahara Desert was a green and fertile savannah, nomads hunted wildlife and herdsmen raised cattle in the western desert as early as 8000 BC. For 4,000 years, the way […]

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Canada and India: Where to now?

Canada and India: Where to now?

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s much-discussed state visit to India in February was seen as an opportunity for a major reset on bilateral relations with the world’s largest democracy. However, things did not go as planned. Canada isn’t alone in its desire to improve relations with the massive country. India, with a GDP of more than […]

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Greatest refugee crisis since the Second World War

Greatest refugee crisis since the Second World War

Last November, Allan Rock visited northern Uganda in the areas adjacent to the South Sudanese border, where refugees fleeing the brutal conflict in South Sudan have settled. What he learned during his discussions with refugees, UN officials and local representatives of international humanitarian and relief agencies is truly remarkable. It is, to be sure, a […]

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Europe’s outlook 2018: Anybody’s guess

| December 18, 2017 | 0 Comments
Europe’s outlook 2018: Anybody’s guess

There are two factors shaping Europe’s outlook for the coming year: what comes out of the Trump world and what comes out of, or into, Europe. Which of the exogenous variables will be the most defining is anyone’s guess. Migrants, Brexit and regional separatism will all play into the unfolding drama of 2018. To that […]

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Latin America: An economic recovery in sight

| December 18, 2017 | 0 Comments
Latin America: An economic recovery in sight

Latin America will enter 2018 on the path to economic recovery from a long recession after the end of the commodities boom of the early 2000s. The region is still smarting under pressures brought to bear by U.S. President Donald Trump on undocumented migrants and especially on Mexico, thanks to his stated aim to renegotiate […]

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Russia and Eurasia: Limited advances in 2018

Russia and Eurasia: Limited advances in 2018

In 2018, Russia will retain its renewed prominent place on the world stage. Vladimir Putin’s vision and military spending have made his country a major player in Syria and the Middle East. In Europe, involvement in Ukraine and the absorption of Crimea continue despite western sanctions, and, across the continent, Russian support fuels nationalist politicians who are […]

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Africa: Not much reason for optimism

| December 18, 2017 | 0 Comments
Africa: Not much reason for optimism

Terrorism, civil conflict, global warming, population growth, urbanization, education, economic sustainability, managing China, strengthening leadership and improving governance are Africa’s 10 most pressing problems as 2018 unfolds. None of these acute challenges is new, but 2018 will see each of them become more central to Africa’s ability to improve the standards of living and social […]

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Canada and the U.S.: Trade tremours

| December 18, 2017 | 0 Comments
Canada and the U.S.: Trade tremours

Looking ahead at what to expect from the U.S. and Canada in 2018 means thinking about the concepts of “disconnect” and attempts to make connections. For the U.S., a disconnect is likely to continue between political institutions and constituents. That disconnect will also continue with Canada bilaterally and with many countries — thanks to American […]

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Asia: Economic growth; political flux

| December 18, 2017 | 0 Comments
Asia: Economic growth; political flux

In the fall of 2017, there were two events in Asia that will set regional patterns into 2018 and beyond. First, Chinese President Xi Jinping’s secretary-general speech to the 19th Chinese Communist Party Congress in October contained his declaration that he would continue to work toward the “Chinese Dream” of becoming a developed country and […]

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The Middle East: Some hope, much despair

The Middle East: Some hope, much despair

Who would have predicted a missing-in-action Lebanese prime minister, one of the deadliest earthquakes in the world and that Syria would lapget ahead of the U.S. in climate policy by joining the Paris Agreement? Change in the Middle East defies prediction. Political leadership has a tendency to swing from the tedious (such as the 42-year […]

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