Christina Spencer

Christina Spencer is the editorial pages editor of the Ottawa Citizen and the inaugural recipient of the Claude Ryan Award for Editorial Writing at the 2017 National Newspaper Awards. She holds a master's in international affairs from the Norman Paterson School of International Affairs at Carleton University.

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Christina Spencer's Latest Posts

China: A hidden workforce and education crisis

| July 9, 2021 | 0 Comments
China: A hidden workforce and education crisis

One recent, pre-COVID-era Christmas, I searched out the neighbourhood Canadian Tire for an instant-read thermometer, a gift for the cook in the family. There were several types on display, and out of curiosity, I started to scan the “Made in …” labels to see if I could find one not manufactured in China. No luck. […]

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Expats: A secret weapon waiting to be discovered

| April 25, 2021 | 0 Comments
Expats: A secret weapon waiting to be discovered

Planet Canada: How Our Expats Are Shaping the Future John Stackhouse Penguin Random House Canada, 2020 351 pages Hardcover: $35 eBook: $16.99 Audiobook download: $32 At any given time, approximately 2.8 million Canadian citizens live abroad. Many are engaged in innovative — and lucrative — work. They’ve led some of the world’s great academic institutions, […]

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A trio of top players: MBS, Pelosi and Trump

| October 31, 2020 | 0 Comments
A trio of top players: MBS, Pelosi and Trump

MBS: The Rise to Power of Mohammed bin Salman Ben Hubbard Tim Duggan Books, Random House, 2020 384 pages Hardcover: $36.63 Kindle: $17 At one point in early adulthood, Mohammed bin Salman, now the crown prince of Saudi Arabia, coveted land from a man who would not sell it, so he demanded that the cleric […]

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On succeeding — and compromising — in Putin’s Russia

| August 2, 2020 | 0 Comments
On succeeding — and compromising — in Putin’s Russia

Between Two Fires: Truth, Ambition, and Compromise in Putin’s Russia By Joshua Yaffa January 2020 Tim Duggan Books, Penguin Random House 368 pages Kindle $17 Hardcover: $36.63 Paperback: $16.55 In 1999, Heda Saratova and her young child huddled, terrified, in their apartment in Grozny, Chechnya, as Russian troops battered the capital of the rebellious republic. […]

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Obama’s and Trump’s champions at the United Nations

| April 3, 2020 | 0 Comments
Obama’s and Trump’s champions at the United Nations

With All Due Respect: Defending America with Grit and Grace By Nikki Haley 272 pages St. Martin’s Press, 2019 Hardcover: $15 Paperback: $18 Kindle: $14.10 Growing up, Nikki Haley and Samantha Power were each the odd girl out. As a child, Haley, the daughter of Indian Sikh immigrants to the United States, was constantly told […]

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Ebola: “A true monster”

| January 2, 2020 | 0 Comments
Ebola: “A true monster”

Crisis in the Red Zone: The Story of the Deadliest Ebola Outbreak in History, and of the Outbreaks to Come By Richard Preston Random House, New York 369 pages Hardcover: $36, eBook $17, audio download $34, Kindle $15 In December 2013, on a tiny patch of land along the border of three African nations — […]

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Chernobyl’s untold story

| September 29, 2019 | 0 Comments
Chernobyl’s untold story

Midnight at Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World’s Greatest Nuclear Disaster By Adam Higginbotham 561 pages Simon & Schuster, 2019 eBook $14.99 Hardcover: $29.95 Paperback: $18.00 Audio download $23.99   On the night of April 26, 1986, a young engineer, Leonid Toptunov, working in the control room of Reactor 4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear […]

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‘Love letter’ to Canada prefers passion over policy

| July 6, 2019 | 0 Comments
‘Love letter’ to Canada prefers passion over policy

Bruce and Vicki Heyman’s The Art of Diplomacy (Simon and Schuster, 2019, 266 pages, $32) is a syrupy fan letter to Canada — a collection of clichés about our weather, our pronunciation, Tim Hortons and Sourtoe cocktails. About the only thing missing is an ode to the BeaverTail. Still, Canada these days needs to welcome […]

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The real business of Beijing

| April 1, 2019 | 0 Comments
The real business of Beijing

In 2017, Australia’s top defence official declared publicly that China was engaged in widespread espionage in his country. Soon after, Australia’s national security agency warned Parliament that the Chinese Communist Party’s actions directly threatened the nation’s sovereignty. The agency’s head said foreign interference had “the potential to cause serious harm to the nation’s sovereignty, the […]

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When women rule the world

| December 29, 2018 | 0 Comments
When women rule the world

A warning: The first chapter of 100 Questions About Women in Politics by Manon Tremblay features a few linguistic eye-glazers — such as “hegemonic scope,” “antagonistic binomials” and “intersectionality.” They made me fear that I wouldn’t be able to plod through many pages without drowning in jargon. Perhaps Tremblay thought about that, too, because both […]

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