Fen Osler Hampson

Fen Osler Hampson is Distinguished
Fellow and Director of Global Security at
the Centre for International Governance
Innovation (CIGI) and Chancellor’s Professor
at Carleton University.

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Fen Osler Hampson's Latest Posts

Big Ideas for tackling world problems

| June 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
Big Ideas for tackling world problems

It’s been called the dismal science. But it’s not really. There is a renaissance in economic thinking that is taking place outside the restrictive boundaries of the economics discipline that will revolution-​ise the way we think about macroeconomics, microeconomics and monetary policy. This revolution is being led by the Institute for New Economic Thinking (INET), […]

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Indonesia: Canada’s interests in the Asia-Pacific’s Muslim juggernaut

| January 5, 2014 | 0 Comments
Indonesia: Canada’s interests in the Asia-Pacific’s Muslim juggernaut

During this century, all eyes have focused on Asia’s two giants, China and India. But there is another juggernaut in the making. It’s Indonesia. It’s the world’s fourth biggest country by population — a staggering 250 million and growing. It is also predominantly Muslim. Over the past several years, Indonesia’s economy has been racing along […]

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After the Arab Spring, hurricane season

| June 28, 2012 | 0 Comments
After the Arab Spring, hurricane season

A year and a half later, the “Arab Spring” protests that have swept the Arab world look a lot more like a clash of four seasons and not simply the onset of one. Its four Rs are revolution, rebellion, religion and recidivism. As in the French and American revolutions, many of those who have taken […]

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A rudderless world

| April 12, 2012 | 0 Comments
A rudderless world

  The revolutions of the Arab Spring have been called “leaderless revolutions” because they were populist uprisings without clear leadership. There is no equivalent to a Bourguiba, Ataturk, Sukarno, Nkrumah, Nyerere, Ho Chi Minh, Gandhi, Houphouet-Boigny or Mandela in the ranks of the protesters in Tahrir Square, or in other Arab capitals, who can rally […]

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The high price of global retrenchment

| February 5, 2012 | 0 Comments
The high price of global retrenchment

Our globalized world is unraveling. This is not the end of globalization, but it is something we have seen before. It is called retrenchment. It is a phenomenon characterized by declining levels of interdependence in global trade and investment, beggar-thy-neighbour policies as states (especially new entrants in the global economy) look out for their own interests and don’t play by […]

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Six essential steps: How John Baird can succeed as Canada’s foreign minister

| October 26, 2011 | 0 Comments
Six essential steps: How John Baird can succeed as Canada’s foreign minister

  John Baird hit the ground running as Canada’s new foreign minister. Within days of his appointment late last spring, he was off on a secret mission to Libya to meet with key rebel leaders of its Transitional National Council. That trip was immediately followed by meetings in Turkey, China, Indonesia, the U.S. and Mexico. […]

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The Visegrad Group: Europe’s new military alliance

| June 26, 2011 | 0 Comments
The Visegrad Group: Europe’s new military alliance

With the Palestinians demonstrating and the International Monetary Fund in turmoil, it might seem odd to focus on something called the Visegrad Group. But this is not a frivolous choice. What the Visegrad Group has decided to do will, I think, resonate for years. The region is Europe — more precisely, the states that had […]

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NATO is neither dead nor dying

| June 26, 2011 | 0 Comments
NATO is neither dead nor dying

Lord Ismay, NATO’s first secretary-general, once wryly observed that the purpose of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) was to “keep the Americans in, the Russians out, and the Germans down.” That political logic kept the alliance together during the Cold War and through the many crises it endured from its inception in 1949 until […]

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Azerbaijan, Georgia, Armenia: East confronts West

| December 1, 2010 | 0 Comments
Azerbaijan, Georgia, Armenia: East confronts West

The South Caucasus has historically been an arena of conflict. Much like the Balkans, it is a region where East and West meet and three great empires — the Russian, the Ottoman, and the Safavids (Persians) — clashed in earlier times. Today, it is a region where other fires burn. These are the fires of economic […]

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Total diplomacy

| September 2, 2010 | 0 Comments
Total diplomacy

A conversation with Morris Rosenberg, Canada’s new deputy foreign minister   The American politician-turned-diplomat, Chester Bowles, who served as ambassador to India under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, once opined that “We are coming to realize that foreign operations in today’s world call for a total diplomacy … ambassadors can no longer be content with wining […]

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