Tag: Featured

Tunisia’s bold gamble on democracy: ‘One day or another, we will win’

| April 5, 2013 | 0 Comments
Tunisia’s bold gamble on democracy:  ‘One day or another, we will win’

In December 2010, the Arab Spring erupted through the impervious soil of authoritarian rule in the Middle East. The Arab awakening drove dictatorial and nepotistic rulers from power, first in Tunisia and then Egypt, Libya and Yemen. Popular protests swept the region — Syria, Algeria, Morocco, Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Jordan, and Sudan, with smaller demonstrations […]

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Kyoto: ‘The silliest of high-minded gestures’

| April 5, 2013 | 0 Comments
Kyoto: ‘The silliest of high-minded gestures’

December 15, 2012 marked the end of what has been a less-than-stellar chapter in Canadian diplomatic history. No, I am not referring to the fact that Canada has pulled out of one of the silliest of the many high-minded gestures that increasingly characterize United Nations diplomacy. Rather, I am taking some satisfaction in Canada’s decision […]

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A world awash in crime

| January 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
A world awash in crime

At a time when the global economy is foundering, there is one sector that isn’t. It’s called transnational organized crime and it’s become a highly lucrative business. Software piracy, internet fraud and trafficking in drugs, humans, wildlife, counterfeit goods and currency, human organs, small arms, diamonds and coloured gemstones, oil, timber, fish, art, cultural property […]

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Syria’s fallout on Jordan, Lebanon and the Kurds

| January 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
Syria’s fallout on Jordan, Lebanon and the Kurds

What happens to Syria’s Kurds may have broader implications for Kurdish populations in Turkey, Iran and Iraq — and regional instability. By Harry Sterling “Revolutions have never lightened the burden of tyranny: they have only shifted it to another shoulder.” When author George Bernard Shaw uttered that pessimistic, certainly cynical, view more than a century ago […]

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Canadian lawyers go to court for human rights

| January 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
Canadian lawyers go to court for human rights

Many Canadians cling to Canada’s past international reputation as a broker of peace, as an important middle power and as a protector of human rights. These sentiments stem from as far back as the 1950s, when then foreign minister Lester Pearson won the Nobel Peace Prize for defusing the Suez Crisis. Yet we also have […]

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Getting the world’s most impoverished nation on its feet

| January 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
Getting the world’s most impoverished nation on its feet

Frantz Liautaud is Haiti’s first ambassador to Canada in five years. The son of a diplomat, he comes to diplomacy from the world of business. Prior to his appointment as ambassador, he was president of the Haitian-Canadian Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The former property developer — has a civil engineering degree from the School […]

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The top 10 hot spots plus 5 runners-up

| January 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
The top 10 hot spots plus 5 runners-up

The wars and rumours of war that will shape 2013 By Wolfgang Depner This piece opens with a proviso. Efforts to predict the future course of human events, no matter how sophisticated they might be, enjoy a less-than-satisfactory record, notwithstanding the recent accomplishments of poll aggregator Nate Silver in forecasting the outcome of the presidential […]

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Press freedom: the right to raise hell

| January 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
Press freedom: the right to raise hell

Only a fraction of the world’s population experiences a free press Laura Neilson Bonikowsky “It is a newspaper’s duty,” The Chicago Times observed in 1861, “to print the news and raise hell.” It is much easier to “print the news,” with or without hell-raising, when journalists are free to do their jobs. In North America, […]

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A sobering report on UN goals

| January 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
A sobering report on UN goals

Jon Lane is the former executive director of the UN’s Water Supply and Sanitation Collaborative Council. WaterCan presented him with the Michael Lubbock Award in October in Ottawa for his contributions in the field of international water and sanitation. The following are excerpts from his acceptance speech. I started work in water and sanitation in […]

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Biodiversity in a bottle

| January 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
Biodiversity in a bottle

Utterly unperturbed, Lili Ana Rodrigues gently pries open the roof of a handmade wooden bee box, slices off paper-thin peaks of miniature mountains made of charcoal-coloured parchment, and carefully inserts a plastic syringe into what should be the dangerous, inner domain of several hundred wild bees. The inner hive is, in fact, pulsating with tiny […]

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