Tag: Canadiana

Canadian citizenship: What it takes

| September 26, 2014 | 0 Comments
Canadian citizenship: What it takes

Think fast — test your knowledge about Canada. Can you name two responsibilities of citizenship? What qualifications are necessary to vote in a federal election? What addition was made to the Constitution of Canada in 1982? The answers, in order, are: obeying the law and voting in elections; being a Canadian citizen at least 18 […]

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The day the circuses came to town

The day the circuses came to town

When the steamship Queen Victoria sailed into Charlottetown Harbour on Sept. 1, 1864, she was the last to arrive at the party, bringing the delegation from the Province of Canada to one of the most significant events in Canada’s history. One would expect that the ship’s arrival would have been cause for a certain amount […]

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O! Canada

| June 22, 2014 | 0 Comments
O! Canada

We often say a particularly mature young person is “not as old as he or she seems.” Canada, on the other hand, is not, by several important measures, nearly as young as it is often thought to be. Every July, we celebrate Canada Day, marking the confederation of the British North American provinces into Canada […]

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The birth of a nation

| April 20, 2014 | 0 Comments
The birth of a nation

Among Canada’s defining events, the Battle of Vimy Ridge in the First World War ranks high. It was a triumph — a major victory for the Allied side after a long, bloody stalemate — and a tragedy. In the four-day battle,   3,598 Canadians died and another 7,004 were wounded. In the near-century since it ended, […]

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Cartier and Macdonald: unlikely allies

| January 5, 2014 | 0 Comments
Cartier and Macdonald: unlikely allies

Canada’s history is filled with events rooted in relationships between two people. Without the alliance between Shawnee chief Tecumseh and British military commander Sir Isaac Brock, the War of 1812 might have been quite different — and Canada might be part of the United States. Before and during the Second World War, the trust that […]

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Emily Murphy’s famous triumph

| September 30, 2013 | 0 Comments
Emily Murphy’s famous triumph

“I feel equal,” wrote Emily Murphy in 1927, “to high and splendid braveries.” By that point in her life, the 59-year-old native of Cookstown, Ont.’s had earned the right to big ambitions: Her achievements included turns as a successful writer (under the name “Janey Canuck”), social activist, self-taught legal expert and, as of 1916, the […]

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Korea: The forgotten war

| July 5, 2013 | 0 Comments
Korea: The forgotten war

When is a war not a war? For the Korean War, the answer is not always clear. This year marks the 60th anniversary of the ceasefire of a war that not everyone describes that way. It had ambiguous beginnings, more than 20 participating countries, and still no formal end. But some things are evident. This […]

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The war of 1812: A native hero named Norton

| April 5, 2013 | 0 Comments
The war of 1812: A native hero named Norton

Canada is a country so vast that too often, it seems, our history is lost inside our geography. A striking example is our country’s First Nations, whose long, rich history is well-preserved by them, but seldom gets the same attention on a broader scale, even when their stories affect us all. Consider Mohawk chief John […]

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A short, chilly history of Canadian winters

| January 4, 2013 | 0 Comments
A short, chilly history of Canadian winters

How often in winter do we cringe at hearing the dreaded question, “Is it cold enough for ya?!” True, it is a conversation opener, and we Canadians do speak volumes about our weather. In Canada, winter is a part of our community to the extent that it defines us in the global consciousness. It also […]

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Eugene Forsey: bringing Canada’s political history to life

| October 4, 2012 | 0 Comments
Eugene Forsey: bringing Canada’s political history to life

“I can remember many people who go a long, long way back in our history,” my father told an interviewer in 1970. “I remember one man who was elected to Parliament in 1867, half a dozen who were elected in 1874 … Sometimes [with] classes in Canadian government, I’m able to say, ‘Oh, no you’ve […]

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